Acute high-intensity interval rowing increases thrombin generation in healthy men

Purpose High-intensity exercise induces several health benefits, but may acutely and transiently increase the risk of cardiovascular events due to thrombotic changes promoting blood coagulation and thrombin formation. This study examined the effects of high-intensity exercise on plasma thrombin generation and triacylglycerol concentrations. Methods Sixteen healthy men completed two, 2-day conditions separated by 1 week. On day 1, participants rested (control) or completed four, 3-min high-intensity rowing intervals at an average rating of perceived exertion of 17 (exercise). Venous blood samples were collected pre- and post-intervention to determine plasma thrombin generation. On day 2, participants rested and consumed a glucose load (0 h) and high-fat meal (2 h). Fifteen venous blood samples were collected between 0 and 8 h to measure plasma thrombin generation and triacylglycerol concentrations. Results On day 1, lag time was shorter and peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential were greater in the exercise than control condition (ES ≥ 0.37, main effect condition P ≤ 0.03), and post-intervention compared with pre-intervention (ES ≥ 0.49, main effect time P ≤ 0.003). The magnitude of the post-intervention change was greater in the exercise than control condition for all thrombin generation parameters (condition by time interaction P ≤ 0.05). On day 2, no differences in postprandial thrombin generation parameters were seen between conditions (P ≥ 0.21). The total area under the curve for triacylglycerol was lower in the exercise than control condition (ES = 0.34, P = 0.02). Conclusion An acute bout of high-intensity interval rowing increased plasma thrombin generation immediately after exercise, but these differences were eliminated 16–24 h after exercise.