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The mediation effect of political interest on the connection between social trust and wellbeing among older adults

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journal contribution
posted on 04.08.2017 by Giovanni Piumatti, Daniele Magistro, Massimiliano Zecca, Dale Esliger
Previous research has established significant positive associations between social trust and wellbeing among older adults. This study aimed to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between different sources of social trust and wellbeing by examining the mediational role of political interest. A sample of 4,406 Italian residents aged 65 years and over was extracted from a national cross-sectional survey during 2013 in Italy, representative of the non-institutionalised population. Measures included trust in people, trust in institutions, political interest, life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Mediation path analysis and structural equation modelling were used to test the mediation effects of political interest on the relationship between trust in people and trust in institutions with life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Associations between trust in people, life satisfaction and self-perceived health, and between trust in institutions and life satisfaction were partially mediated by political interest, while the association between trust in institutions and self-perceived health was fully mediated by political interest. Having high levels of political interest may thus enhance the relationship between social trust and wellbeing among older adults. These results suggest that interventions to enhance wellbeing in older adults may benefit from examining individuals’ levels of political interest.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Ageing and Society

Volume

38

Issue

11

Pages

2376-2395

Citation

PIUMATTI, G. ... et al, 2017. The mediation effect of political interest on the connection between social trust and wellbeing among older adults. Ageing and Society, 38 (11), pp.2376-2395.

Publisher

© Cambridge University Press

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Acceptance date

21/06/2017

Publication date

2017-07-31

Notes

This article has been published in a revised form in Ageing and Society http://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X1700071X. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © Cambridge University Press.

ISSN

0144-686X

eISSN

1469-1779

Language

en

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