‘Mea culpa’: the social production of public disclosure and reconciliation

2009-11-20T15:23:29Z (GMT) by Cristian Tileaga
It can be sensibly argued that transformations of social, political and moral frameworks for constructing personal and political subjectivities have been taking place in a variety of forms and with different effects across a range of Eastern European contexts. In order to understand and describe individual experiences of social change researchers have usually been engaged in documenting the nature of these particular transformations of social, political and moral frameworks for constructing personal and political subjectivities. Although this is a very important research goal in its own right, it may not tell the whole story. Some questions still remain: How are these social, political and moral frameworks constructed by members of society through the use of various cultural and discursive resources to make sense of themselves and others? How are personal and political subjectivities actually constructed and reproduced, assumed or contested? The transition from communism to democracy has been a period when possibilities of constructing and affirming (alternative) personal and political subjectivities/identities have been innumerable. At the same time, this period has also been one of reevaluating and re-affirming personal/political biographies from under the sway of the Communist and post-communist recent past. This chapter is an attempt to capture individual experiences of social change through an example of ‘re-acquisition of biography’ (Miller, 1999) and reconciliation with the past ....