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But does it work in theory? Androcentric blind spots and omissions

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posted on 20.08.2020, 13:55 by Hilary RobinsonHilary Robinson
Since 2008 there has been a significant increase in politically informed art, activist art, and visual activism, often led by women and informed by feminism. However, the writers about this moment have been mainly men, mainly white, and mainly based in the USA. Such writers embrace radical politics, and we might assume they are allies of feminists; however, in order to build an effective, united, radical front, we must critically question all sources and structures of power. Many such post-2008 writings write women out of their accounts or romanticize the representation of women. What are the shortcomings of such writings of history and for theorizing the aesthetics of activist practices, and how can we build an inclusive analytical toolbox for an imbricated radical future? What are the new weapons for activism that are fleeing academic, artistic, and political patriarchal practices?

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • Politics and International Studies

Published in

Art and Activism in the Age of Systemic Crisis: Aesthetic Resilience

Pages

24 - 38

Publisher

Routledge

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Taylor and Francis

Publisher statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Art and Activism in the Age of Systemic Crisis: Aesthetic Resilience on 07 Oct 20, available online: http://www.routledge.com/9780367219840.

Publication date

2020-10-07

Copyright date

2021

ISBN

9780367219840; 9780429269189

Book series

Routledge Research in Art and Politics

Language

en

Editor(s)

Eliza Steinbock; Bram Ieven; Marijke de Valck

Depositor

Prof Hilary Robinson. Deposit date: 18 August 2020

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