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Experimental evidence of the acoustic black hole effect for flexural waves in tapered plates

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conference contribution
posted on 19.04.2012 by Victor V. Krylov, Edward Winward
A new efficient method of reducing edge reflections of flexural waves in plates or bars based on the 'acoustic black hole effect' has been recently proposed and described theoretically by one of the present authors [1] (see also [2-4]). The method utilises a gradual change in thickness of a plate or bar, partly covered by thin damping layers, from the value corresponding to the thickness of the basic plate or bar (which is to be damped) to almost zero. The present paper describes the results of the experimental investigation of the damping system consisting of a steel plate (wedge) of quadratic shape covered on one side by a strip of absorbing layer. The results of the measurements of point mobility in such a system show that for the wedge covered by an absorbing layer there is a significant reduction of resonant peaks, in comparison with the uncovered wedge or with the covered plate of constant thickness. Thus, the measurements confirm the existence of the acoustic black hole effect for flexural waves and demonstrate the possibility of its use in practice.

History

School

  • Aeronautical, Automotive, Chemical and Materials Engineering

Department

  • Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering

Citation

KRYLOV, K.K. and WINWARD, R.E.T.B., 2005. Experimental evidence of the acoustic black hole effect for flexural waves in tapered plates. IN: Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, Lisbon, Portugal, 11-14 th July.

Publisher

© International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration

Version

NA (Not Applicable or Unknown)

Publication date

2005

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Language

en

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