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Sand dams: harvesting rainwater from sand rivers

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:10 by Ian Neal, Simon Maddrell
Sand dams are a key tool for the restoration of degraded lands and self-supply water technology in dryland regions and thereby addressing poverty, hunger, conflict, climate change and creating green economic growth – all at the same time. The majority of the world’s sand dams are found in Kenya. This paper describes what sand dams are, the benefits and impacts they deliver and some different ways they can be applied within development programmes.
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School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

NEAL, I. and MADDRELL, S., 2013. Sand dams: harvesting rainwater from sand rivers. IN: Shaw, R.J. (ed). Delivering water, sanitation and hygiene services in an uncertain environment: Proceedings of the 36th WEDC International Conference, Nakuru, Kenya, 1-5 July 2013, 5pp.

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© WEDC, Loughborough University

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VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2013

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:20800

Language

en

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