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String cavitation formation inside fuel injectors

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posted on 24.11.2016 by Ben Reid, M. Gavaises, N. Mitroglou, Graham Hargrave, Colin Garner, R.M. McDavid
The formation of vortex or 'string' cavitation has been visualised at pressures up to 2000 bar in an automotive-sized optical diesel fuel injector nozzle. The multi-hole nozzle geometry studied allowed observation of the hole-to-hole vortex interaction and, in particular, that of a bridging vortex in the sac region between the holes. Above a threshold Reynolds number, their formation and appearance during a 2 ms injection event was repeatable and independent of upstream pressure and cavitation number. In addition, two different hole layouts and threedimensional flow simulations have been employed to describe how, the relative positions of adjacent holes influenced the formation and hole-to-hole interaction of the observed string cavitation vortices, with good agreement between the experimental and simulation results being achieved.

Funding

This work has been technically and financially supported by Caterpillar Inc. and the UK Technology Strategy Board. Project No, TP/3/DSM/6/I/15289.

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Published in

Journal of Physics: Conference Series

Volume

656

Issue

1

Citation

REID, B.A. ...et al., 2015. String cavitation formation inside fuel injectors. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 656, 012099.

Publisher

© The Authors. Published by IOP Publishing LTD

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Publication date

2015

Notes

This paper was presented at 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015), Lausanne, 6-9th December. This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Institute of Physics under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

ISSN

1742-6588

eISSN

1742-6596

Language

en

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