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Children: a vital component for achieving total sanitation and associated benefits (Bangladesh case study)

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:10 authored by Libbet Loughnan, Emily Rand, Louise Maule, R. Ahmed
While the impact of poor sanitation is often measured by the effects on children, most sanitation interventions target adults. Global monitoring of sanitation coverage against the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) generally also overlooks sanitation among young children. In Bangladesh, the faeces of only 22% of children under age three were disposed of safely in 2006, and children in more marginalized households were least likely to have their faeces safely disposed of. Even in households with improved sanitation, 22% of children’s faeces were reported to be left in the open. These inequities are emblematic of trends seen in developing countries worldwide. This paper provides a policy and programming-relevant overview of child sanitation in Bangladesh, a country with relatively more interventions focused on increasing demand, improving supply, and creating an enabling environment for the safe disposal of child faeces.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

LOUGHNAN, L. ... et al, 2014. Children: a vital component for achieving total sanitation and associated benefits (Bangladesh case study). IN: Shaw, R.J., Anh, N.V. and Dang, T.H. (eds). Sustainable water and sanitation services for all in a fast changing world: Proceedings of the 37th WEDC International Conference, Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-19 September 2014, 6pp.

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© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2014

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:21906

Language

en

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