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Developing a benchmarking tool for measuring the effectiveness of local authority domestic energy reduction policies

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conference contribution
posted on 05.06.2013, 15:36 by Jonathan Morris, David Allinson, John Harrison, Kevin LomasKevin Lomas
The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) promote Local Authorities as their preferred route for implementing policies aimed at reducing domestic sector energy consumption, and delivering the Government’s 2050 energy and climate targets. DECC provide data at lower layer super output area (LSOA) to aid monitoring strategies. These data in principle enable the change in energy demand over time and the relative energy use in different regions to be understood. However there is at present little incentive for Local Authorities to initiate local domestic reduction policies. Furthermore it remains unclear if national datasets are suitable for measuring and monitoring the success of Local Authorities. This paper argues the need for an improved benchmarking tool to measure the effectiveness of Local Authorities in this task. It utilises data – covering demographic, economic and climatic factors – to calculate descriptive statistics, and correlation and regression analysis to examine the relationships between these factors and domestic energy consumption. The analysis is to be expanded, incorporating further demographic, economic and built form data to try and develop a stronger statistical model, while collaboration with Local Authorities is to be sought in order to develop practical applications.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Citation

MORRIS, J. ... et al, 2011. Developing a benchmarking tool for measuring the effectiveness of local authority domestic energy reduction policies. “Buildings Don’t Use Energy, People Do?”: Research Students' Conference on Domestic Energy Use and CO2 Emissions in Existing Dwellings, Bath, 28th June 2011, 12pp

Publisher

Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2011

Notes

This paper was presented at “Buildings Don't Use Energy, People Do?”: Research Students' Conference on Domestic Energy Use and CO2 Emissions in Existing Dwellings, Bath, UK, 28 June 2011.

Language

en