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Linking community to policy level support: the CARE-Zambia trust model

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:09 by Cathryn Kadimba-Mwanamwambwa, Hope Chileshe-Nkoloma, Sam Kayaga
Zambia is one of the most highly urbanized countries in the Sub-Sahara Africa, but the rate of urbanization has not matched with infrastructure development and other service provision. Lusaka the capital city has 33 Peri-Urban areas, which account for over 60% of the city’s population. The Water Supply and Sanitation services in these settlements are poor, inadequate, unreliable, with at least 56% and 90% of the peri-urban populations not having access to safe Water Supply and satisfactory Sanitation facilities respectively (PUWSS Report 1999). In order to address this situation, the Government of the Republic of Zambia embarked upon a sector wide restructuring exercise in 1993 which provided an enabling policy environment for International NGOs to develop and implement innovative management models that would embrace the interests of communities and Government. This paper shares the ‘Water Trust Model’, an innovation of CARE Zambia currently operational in 6 Peri-Urban Settlements of Lusaka.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

KADIMBA-MWANAMWAMBWA, C. ... et al, 2005. Linking community to policy level support: the CARE-Zambia trust model. IN: Kayaga, S. (ed). Maximising the benefits from water and environmental sanitation: Proceedings of the 31st WEDC International Conference, Kampala, Uganda, 31 October-4 November 2005, pp. 214-217.

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© WEDC, Loughborough University

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VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2005

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:11964

Language

en

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