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Measuring use of household drinking water filters: field experiences from Ethiopia

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:09 by Richard B. Johnston, T. Edosa, Lars Osterwalder
In rural Ethiopia, household defluoridation filters have been distributed in an effort to reduce fluoride exposure through drinking and cooking water. Submersible dataloggers were used to measure stored water levels in household filters, and to calculate the frequency of filter filling, as well as the amount of water added to and withdrawn from filters. These quantitative estimates of filter use are compared against different measures of self-reported filter use. Tally counters were also investigated as an alternative to simple self-reported filter usage. Comparison to datalogger records shows that tally counters underreport the frequency of filter filling, while household reports of filling frequency matched rather closely. However, households report treating much larger volumes of water than were calculated from datalogger records. Datalogger records indicate consumption of approximately 12.5 litres per day per filter, or 2.0 litres per person per day, which is probably adequate for drinking but not for cooking.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

JOHNSTON, RICHARD B. ... et al, 2011. Measuring use of household drinking water filters: field experiences from Ethiopia. IN: Shaw, R.J. (ed). The future of water, sanitation and hygiene in low-income countries - Innovation, adaptation and engagement in a changing world: Proceedings of the 35th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough, UK, 6-8 July 2011, 7p.p.

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© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2011

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:12363

Language

en

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