DDL2017 Gavtash et. al Multi-physics theoretical approach to predict pMDI spray characteristics FINAL VERSION.pdf (739.58 kB)
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Multi-physics theoretical approach to predict pMDI spray characteristics

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conference contribution
posted on 01.02.2017, 09:47 by Barzin Gavtash, Hendrik VersteegHendrik Versteeg, Graham Hargrave, Ben Myatt, David Lewis, Tanya Church, G. Brambilla
Continued success in treatment of asthma and COPD requires development of new formulations, which may alter spray characteristics and atomisation quality of atomiser devices such as pMDI. Fundamental understanding of the underlying physical phenomena and the dynamic nature of pMDI aerosol plumes is essential to maintain pMDI device atomisation quality. In this paper, we describe a simulation of pMDI aerosol generation and plume development using a model of two-phase flow and atomisation of HFA134/ethanol formulation. The model is implemented within a CFD simulation to study the dynamic aerosol development and predict spray velocity and temperature. The CFD result shows plume velocity slows down over a relatively short distance and droplet temperature settles at a steady value of 291 K approximately at a distance of 30 mm from the spray orifice. This means that droplets reach their final size before reaching the exit of the mouthpiece.

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Published in

Drug Delivery to the Lungs 27

Pages

73 - 76 (4)

Citation

GAVTASH, B. ... et al, 2016. Multi-physics theoretical approach to predict pMDI spray characteristics. Drug Delivery to the Lungs 27, 7th-9th December 2016, Edinburgh, pp.73-76

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

12/10/2016

Publication date

2016

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Language

en

Location

Edinburgh

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Keywords

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