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Options analysis model for water demand management

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:09 authored by Daniel J. Van Rooijen, Sam Kayaga, Ian K. Smout
To cope with the needs of increasing urban populations amidst negative impacts of climate change will require mainstreaming water demand management (WDM) in urban water management strategies for the city of the future. There are a variety of options for WDM: urban water managers, engineers and planners need to make correct choices of the most viable options that fit within the socio-cultural, political, economic and environmental context. Ideally, these choices take into consideration the vision of the key city stakeholders and identified scenarios over the longer-term period. This paper describes a simple model developed as one of the outputs of the WDM research under the EU-sponsored SWITCH project, to be used as a decision support tool by urban engineers, planners and managers, with no skills in linear programming. The model uses a VENSIM modelling shell that is freely available on the internet. Application of this tool will make it easier to mainstream WDM options in strategic planning processes for the city of the future.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

VAN ROOIJEN, DANIEL J. ... et al, 2011. Options analysis model for water demand management. IN: Shaw, R.J. (ed). The future of water, sanitation and hygiene in low-income countries - Innovation, adaptation and engagement in a changing world: Proceedings of the 35th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough, UK, 6-8 July 2011, 8p.p.

Publisher

© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2011

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:13350

Language

en

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