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Quetta - growing water demand from declining resources

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:08 by David R. Birch, Yaver Abidi, Martin Perkins
The Quetta valley in Northern Balochistan is an arid mountainous valley. Over the past 15 years the demand for water has increased significantly as cheap electricity has made pumping from groundwater for the irrigation of high value deciduous fruit a major economic activity and the population of Quetta has expanded, largely as a result of the expansion of high value agriculture. The availability of low cost electricity together with a culture that has historically considered water as being free to all, has led to huge demands for groundwater. From the information available it is clear however, that groundwater in the Quetta valley is being mined, with groundwater levels falling at 1m a year, which is a cause for concern that demands immediate attention. This paper looks at the problem and potential mitigation measures. These include control of abstraction for agriculture through legislation and pricing, institutional measures to monitor and control abstraction, alternative surface water development options, artificial groundwater recharge and reducing urban demand.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

BIRCH, D.R., ABIDI, Y. and PERKINS, M., 1998. Quetta - growing water demand from declining resources. IN: Pickford, J. (ed). Sanitation and water for all: Proceedings of the 24th WEDC International Conference, Islamabad, Pakistan, 31 August-4 September 1998, pp.287-289.

Publisher

© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

1998

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:10811

Language

en

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