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Regulating urban water services for the poor: the Zambian case study

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conference contribution
posted on 04.07.2012, 10:21 by Sam KayagaSam Kayaga, Richard Franceys
Economic regulation of urban water service providers is necessary to guard the equity principle and promote universal water service coverage that is an overarching target for achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This paper reports on research carried out in Lusaka, Zambia, one of seven worldwide case-studies on how to incorporate the needs of the urban poor, through a universal service obligation, as a primary duty of regulation. The study found that NWASCO, the Zambian regulator has made commendable progress towards ‘good regulation’ principles of independence, accountability, consistency, transparency, proportionality and equitable targeting of interventions. Clearly, there good lessons for policy makers in other developing countries to learn from the way regulation structures, systems and procedures were set up in Zambia, and how they are functioning at present Recommendations have been made to improve these attributes.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Citation

KAYAGA, S. and FRANCEYS, R., 2007. Regulating urban water services for the poor: the Zambian case study. IWA International Conference on Water Management and Technology Applications in Developing Countries, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Publisher

© International Water Association

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2007

Notes

This paper was presented at the IWA International Conference on Water & Wastewater Management for Developing Countries, Kuala Lumpur, May 2007. The document is an output from the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Knowledge and Research Project, Contract R8320, a study for the benefit of developing countries.

Language

en