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Reinforced blockwork water storage tanks

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:09 authored by Laurent M. Shirima
One of the most important needs of any community development is a safe and adequate supply of potable water. Unfortunately, there is still a shortage of clean water supply in rural regions of many developing countries like, for example, in Tanzania. A large proportion of the rural population in such countries rely on the availability of man-made wells, natural springs and rivers, and recently on limited piped water supply schemes. The majority of such sources are not at economical distances from the dwellings. The effectiveness of piped water supply depends on the availability of water storage tanks. Reinforced blockwork tanks are used as water distribution and storage facilities in some rural areas in Tanzania. They consist of reinforced concrete roof and floor slabs while the walls are made of reinforced blockwork. The blockwork is made of concrete blocks that contain grooves into which reinforcing bars are laid and embedded in cement mortar. This paper will discuss matters related to design and construction of such tanks. Since severe cracking and leakage were observed physically to be the major problems, the authors intend to present, in view of research results, ways by which the tanks can be designed to minimise crack widths and water losses through them.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

SHIRIMA, L.M., 1996. Reinforced blockwork water storage tanks. IN: Pickford, J. et al. (eds). Reaching the unreached - Challenges for the 21st century: Proceedings of the 22nd WEDC International Conference, New Delhi, India, 9-13 September 1996, pp.205-207.

Publisher

© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

1996

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:12877

Language

en

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