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Relying on markets to address human rights: sanitation supply chain analysis in low-density settings

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:10 by Anna Gero, Thanh Doan Trieu, S. Mohr, P. Rickwood, Gabrielle Halcrow, Juliet Willetts
Market-based approaches to improving sanitation coverage have increased in recent years, however the equity implications of these approaches, particularly in the face of the recently established human right to sanitation in 2010, requires a closer examination of the costs of sanitation products and services in remote, rural locations. This paper presents results from a recent study examining the sanitation supply-chain in the province of Dien Bien in north-west Vietnam, a low-density rural setting with high rates of poverty. It was found that current toilet coverage is lower in areas of high poverty, and that these areas also experience the highest costs of sanitation products due to the impact of distance and transport costs. We conclude that market-based approaches require nuanced application and that other forms of support or significant market intervention are likely required to ensure equitable outcomes in remote rural contexts.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

GERO, A. ... et al, 2014. Relying on markets to address human rights: sanitation supply chain analysis in low-density settings. IN: Shaw, R.J., Anh, N.V. and Dang, T.H. (eds). Sustainable water and sanitation services for all in a fast changing world: Proceedings of the 37th WEDC International Conference, Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-19 September 2014, 6pp.

Publisher

© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2014

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:21884

Language

en

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