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Technologies for sanitation: how to determine appropriate sludge treatment strategies in Vietnam

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conference contribution
posted on 12.02.2018, 15:10 authored by Magalie Bassan, Nguyet Dao, Viet A. Nguyen, C. Holliger, Linda Strande
Developing appropriate technologies for the sanitation chain in low- and middle-income countries is crucial to protect public and environmental health. This includes treatment systems for the sludge produced in onsite and centralized systems (i.e., faecal and wastewater sludge). As the quantities and characteristics of sludge differ from city to city, this requires context-specific technologies. This case study was conducted to identify potential management strategies in five cities in Vietnam. The influence of the enabling environment, existing infrastructures, local sanitation practices and socioeconomic contexts on the selection of technology was assessed through literature reviews, household surveys and interviews. A checklist of influential aspects is presented to make best use of local opportunities and minimize the risks of technology failure. This approach is applicable to develop sludge management strategies in other cities.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

WEDC Conference

Citation

BASSAN, M. ... et al, 2014. Technologies for sanitation: how to determine appropriate sludge treatment strategies in Vietnam. IN: Shaw, R.J., Anh, N.V. and Dang, T.H. (eds). Sustainable water and sanitation services for all in a fast changing world: Proceedings of the 37th WEDC International Conference, Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-19 September 2014, 6pp.

Publisher

© WEDC, Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2014

Notes

This is a conference paper.

Other identifier

WEDC_ID:21856

Language

en

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