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Supplementary Information files for: Differential responses of macroinvertebrate ionomes across experimental N:P gradients in detritus-based headwater streams

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posted on 18.08.2020 by Clay Prater, Phillip M Bumpers, Lee M. Demi, Amy D. Rosemond, Punidan D. Jeyasingh
Supplementary Information files for: Differential responses of macroinvertebrate ionomes across experimental N:P gradients in detritus-based headwater streams
Diverse global change processes are reshaping the biogeochemistry of stream ecosystems. Nutrient enrichment is a common stressor that can modify flows of biologically important elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) through stream foodwebs by altering the stoichiometric composition of stream organisms. However, enrichment effects on concentrations of other important essential and trace elements in stream taxa are less understood. We investigated shifts in macroinvertebrate ionomes in response to changes in coarse benthic organic matter (CBOM) stoichiometry following N and P enrichment of five detritus-based headwater streams. Concentrations of most elements (17/19) differed among three insect genera (Maccaffertium sp., Pycnopsyche spp., and Tallaperla spp.) prior to enrichment. Genus-specific changes in the body content of: P, magnesium, and sodium (Na) in Tallaperla; P, Na, and cadmium in Pycnopsyche; and P in Maccaffertium were also found across CBOM N:P gradients. These elements increased in Tallaperla but decreased in the other two taxa due to growth dilution at larger body sizes. Multivariate elemental differences were found across all taxa, and ionome-wide shifts with dietary N and P enrichment were also observed in Tallaperla and Pycnopsyche. Our results show that macroinvertebrates exhibit distinct differences in elemental composition beyond C, N, and P and that the ionomic composition of common stream taxa can vary with body size and N and P enrichment. Thus, bottom-up changes in N and P supplies could potentially influence the cycling of lesser studied biologically essential elements in aquatic environments by altering their relative proportions in animal tissues.

Funding

National Science Foundation (NSF; DEB‐0918904)

National Science Foundation (NSF; DEB‐0918894)

National Science Foundation (NSF award DEB‐0823293)

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  • Social Sciences and Humanities

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  • Geography and Environment

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