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Acute effects of breaking up prolonged sedentary time on cardiovascular disease risk markers in adults with paraplegia

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posted on 02.04.2020, 11:04 by Daniel Bailey, Thomas Withers, Vicky Goosey-Tolfrey, David Dunstan, Christof Leicht, Rachael Champion, Opie Charlett, Louise Ferrandino
Elevated levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk markers are highly prevalent in people with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Breaking up prolonged sedentary time with short, regular bouts of physical activity can reduce postprandial glucose and lipid levels in able‐bodied individuals. The effects in people with paraplegia are unknown. The study aims were to examine the acute postprandial glucose (primary aim), lipid, blood pressure, and psychological responses (secondary aims) to breaking up prolonged sedentary time in individuals with paraplegia. This was a randomized crossover design trial. Fourteen participants with paraplegia (age 51 ± 9 years, trunk fat mass 44.3 ± 7.7%) took part in the following two, 5.5‐hour conditions: (1) uninterrupted sedentary time (SED), and (2) sedentary time interrupted with 2 minutes of moderate‐intensity arm crank ergometer physical activity every 20 minutes (SED‐ACT). Standardized breakfast and lunch test meals were consumed during each condition. The outcomes were compared between conditions using linear mixed models. Glucose area under the curve (AUC) was significantly lower during the lunch postprandial period in SED‐ACT vs SED (incremental AUC 1.9 [95% CI 1.0, 2.7) and 3.0 [2.1, 3.9] mmol/L∙2.5 hour, respectively, P = .015, f = 0.34). There were no differences between conditions for the breakfast or total 5.5 hours postprandial periods (P > .05). Positive affect was higher in SED‐ACT than SED (P = .001). Breaking up prolonged sedentary time acutely attenuates lunch postprandial glucose and improves positive affect in people with paraplegia. This may have clinical relevance for reducing CVD risk and improving psychological well‐being in this population.

Funding

Heart Research UK. Grant Number: RG2655/17/18

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports

Volume

30

Issue

8

Pages

1398 - 1408

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Acceptance date

24/03/2020

Publication date

2020-04-21

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

0905-7188

eISSN

1600-0838

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Vicky Tolfrey Deposit date: 1 April 2020

Licence

Exports