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Associations of overall sedentary time and screen time with sleep outcomes

journal contribution
posted on 22.07.2016 by Jeff K. Vallance, Matthew P. Buman, Clare Stevinson, Brigid M. Lynch
Objective: The objective of this secondary analysis was to examine associations of accelerometer-assessed sedentary time and self-reported screen time with sleep outcomes. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 1,674 adults from the 2005-2006 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Accelerometers were used to assess sedentary time. Screen time and sleep metrics were assessed via self-report. Results: Accelerometer-assessed sedentary time was not associated with sleep outcomes. Compared to participants with the least screen time (<2h/day), participants with the most screen time (>6h/day) were more likely to report trouble falling asleep (OR=2.78, 95% CI: 1.21, 6.40) and wake during the night (OR=2.55, 95% CI: 1.17, 5.52). Conclusions: With respect to sleep outcomes, context-specific sedentary behaviors may be more important than overall sedentary time.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR

Volume

39

Issue

1

Pages

62 - 67 (6)

Citation

VALLANCE, J.K. ...et al., 2015. Associations of overall sedentary time and screen time with sleep outcomes. American Journal of Health Behavior, 39(1), pp. 62-67.

Publisher

PNG PUBLICATIONS

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2015

Notes

This paper is in closed access.

ISSN

1945-7359

Language

en

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