IR_Why Some Fuzzy Thinking Might Help_European_Journal_Communication_25(4) 1–17.pdf (309.21 kB)

Comparative media analysis: why some fuzzy thinking might help. Applying fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis to the personalization of mediated political communication

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journal contribution
posted on 12.12.2013 by John Downey, James Stanyer
This article examines the benefits of fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) for comparative media research. It shows the advantages of fuzzy set theoretic thinking in examining the causes of a major feature of contemporary political communication research, namely personalization. The article has three parts. The first is a critique of the method adopted by Hallin and Mancini, a generally laudable and highly influential recent contribution to comparative media analysis. The second is a brief introduction to fsQCA. The third demonstrates the method’s usefulness by investigating the personalized character of mediated political communication.

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Communication, Media, Social and Policy Studies

Citation

DOWNEY, J. and STANYER, J., 2010. Comparative media analysis: why some fuzzy thinking might help. Applying fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis to the personalization of mediated political communication. European Journal of Communication, 25 (4), pp. 331 - 347.

Publisher

Sage Publications Ltd / © The authors

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2010

Notes

This article was published in the serial, European Journal of Communication [Sage Publications Ltd / © The authors]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267323110384256

ISSN

0267-3231

Language

en

Exports