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Does administrative data reflect individual experience? Comparing an index of poverty with individually collected data on financial well-being in a multi-ethnic community

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posted on 11.03.2016 by Stephanie L. Prady, Karen Bloor, Jonathan Bradshaw, Helena Tunstall, Emily Petherick, Kate E. Pickett
The Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI) uses administrative data to count children living in households in receipt of both in-work and out-of-work means-tested benefits and provides small area ranking as an indicator of child poverty in neighbourhoods. Benefit take-up rates within an area will affect its reliability. We aimed to examine benefit take-up rates and compare area ranking by the IDACI with ranking using individually reported data across areas of varying ethnic composition. Mothers living in areas with high minority ethnic density were less likely to report claiming a benefit than those in majority White or mixed areas, despite reporting lower incomes. The correlation between self-reported material difficulties and worsening IDACI rank was much lower in areas characterised by minority ethnic populations. Further investigation into the performance of area-based deprivation measures in areas with high minority ethnic density is needed.

Funding

This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR CLAHRC YH).

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Social Policy and Society

Pages

1 - 23

Citation

PRADY, S.L. ... et al, 2016. Does administrative data reflect individual experience? Comparing an index of poverty with individually collected data on financial well-being in a multi-ethnic community. Social Policy and Society, 15 (4), pp.513-535.

Publisher

© Cambridge University Press

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2016

Notes

This paper is the accepted version of an article subsequently published in the journal, Social Policy and Society [© Cambridge University Press]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1474746415000597

ISSN

1474-7464

eISSN

1475-3073

Language

en

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