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Early risk factors for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress after hospital admission for unintentional injury: Multicentre cohort study

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posted on 05.07.2018 by Denise Kendrick, Ruth Baker, Trevor Hill, Kate Beckett, Carol Coupland, Blerina Kellezi, Stephen Joseph, Jo Barnes, Jude Sleney, Nicola Christie, Richard Morriss
Objective To quantify psychological morbidity and identify baseline factors associated with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress symptoms up to 12 months post-injury. Methods Multicentre cohort study of 668 adults, aged 16 to 70, admitted to 4 UK NHS hospital trusts. Data on injury, socio-demographic characteristics and health status was collected at recruitment. Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress were measured at 1, 2, 4 and 12 months post-injury. Multilevel linear regression assessed associations between patient and injury characteristics and psychological outcomes over 12 months follow-up. Results Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress scores were highest 1 month post-injury, and remained above baseline at 2, 4 and 12 months post-injury. Moderate or severe injuries, previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury depression and anxiety scores, middle age (45–64 years), greater deprivation and lower pre-injury quality of life (QoL) were associated with higher depression scores post-injury. Previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury depression and anxiety scores, middle age, greater deprivation and lower pre-injury QoL were associated with higher anxiety scores post-injury. Traffic injuries or injuries from being struck by objects, multiple injures (≥3), being female, previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury anxiety scores and greater deprivation were associated with higher post-traumatic distress scores post-injury. Conclusion A range of risk factors, identifiable shortly after injury, are associated with psychological morbidity occurring up to 12 months post-injury in a general trauma population. Further research is required to explore the utility of these, and other risk factors in predicting psychological morbidity on an individual patient basis.

Funding

This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research(NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire and by Rushcliffe Clinical Commissioning Group. Richard Morriss is currently funded by NIHR CLAHRC East Midlands

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Published in

Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Citation

KENDRICK, D. ...et al., 2018. Early risk factors for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress after hospital admission for unintentional injury: Multicentre cohort study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 112, pp. 15-24.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

14/05/2018

Publication date

2018-06-12

Notes

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Journal of Psychosomatic Research and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.06.008

ISSN

0022-3999

Language

en

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