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Effects of horizontal whole-body vibration and standing posture on activity interference

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posted on 16.03.2010 by William D.R. Baker, Neil Mansfield
Standing people are exposed to whole-body vibration in many environments. This paper investigates the effects of horizontal whole-body vibration and standing posture on task performance. Sixteen participants were exposed to random vibration (up to 4Hz), whilst performing a timed pegboard task in two standing postures. Objective and subjective indicators of performance were used. Time taken to complete the task increased progressively with increases in vibration magnitude; the fore-and-aft posture generally showed greater performance decrements and postural interruptions (>1.0ms-2 r.m.s.) than the lateral. For both postures, performance was better during y-axis vibration than during x-axis vibration. Subjective ratings showed similar trends to time data. Impairments due to dual axis exposure were well predicted using r.s.s. summation calculations based on single axis components. These results indicate that best performance for those standing in moving environments will be achieved if individuals adopt a lateral posture with the most severe vibration in the y-axis.

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Citation

BAKER, W.D.R. and MANSFIELD, N.J., 2010. Effects of horizontal whole-body vibration and standing posture on activity interference. Ergonomics, 53 (3), pp.365-374.

Publisher

© Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2010

Notes

This article was published in the journal, Ergonomics [© Taylor & Francis] and the definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140130903402242

ISSN

0014-0139;1366-5847

Language

en

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