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Extracorporeal shock wave therapy plus rehabilitation for insertional and noninsertional achilles tendinopathy shows good results across a range of domains of function

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journal contribution
posted on 22.03.2019 by Patrick Wheeler
Achilles tendinopathy, both insertional and noninsertional, is a common cause of posterior ankle pain. Although the condition of most patients improves with simple conservative measures, a proportion will go on develop chronic symptoms. This study examines the outcomes of patients following extracorporeal shock wave therapy plus a home exercise program. This prospective case series study involves a total of 39 patients, with a mean follow-up duration of 163 (range 65 to 385) days. This has demonstrated significant benefits in pain, stiffness, and a range of measures of local and global function. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) values for average self-reported pain improved from 6.5 of 10 (IQR 5.0 to 7.8) at baseline to 3.5 of 10 (IQR 2.0 to 5.1) at 3 months and to 2.0 of 10 (IQR 0.6 to 4.8) at 6 months for patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy. This compares to improvements from 7.0 of 10 (IQR 7.0 to 8.0) at baseline to 6.0 of 10 (IQR 5.6 to 6.8) at 3 months and to 6.0 of 10 (IQR 3.0 to 7.0) at 6 months for patients with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. Statistically significant improvements were seen in insertional tendinopathy across a range of outcome measures; however, these were less apparent for patients with noninsertional tendinopathy. Despite these figures, no significant differences were seen in the outcomes for patients with insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. Despite the improvements seen in the aspects of pain and function, physical activity levels had not increased following the treatment.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery

Volume

58

Issue

4

Pages

617 - 622

Citation

WHEELER, P.C., 2019. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy plus rehabilitation for insertional and noninsertional achilles tendinopathy shows good results across a range of domains of function. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, 58 (4), pp.617-622.

Publisher

Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2018.11.005.

Acceptance date

30/11/2018

Publication date

2019-03-23

Copyright date

2018

ISSN

1067-2516

Language

en

Exports