Webb et al. 2020.pdf (1.02 MB)

Measuring commissioners’ willingness-to-pay for community based childhood obesity prevention programmes using a discrete choice experiment

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journal contribution
posted on 30.10.2020, 11:47 by Edward JD Webb, Elizabeth Stamp, Michelle Collinson, Amanda J Farrin, June Stevens, Wendy Burton, Harry Rutter, Holly Schofield, Maria Bryant
Abstract Background In the UK, rates of childhood obesity remain high. Community based programmes for child obesity prevention are available to be commissioned by local authorities. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding how programmes are commissioned and which attributes of programmes are valued most by commissioners. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that decision-makers prioritise when commissioning programmes that target childhood obesity prevention. Methods An online discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to survey commissioners and decision makers in the UK to assess their willingness-to-pay for childhood obesity programmes. Results A total of 64 commissioners and other decision makers completed the DCE. The impact of programmes on behavioural outcomes was prioritised, with participants willing to pay an extra £16,600/year if average daily fruit and vegetable intake increased for each child by one additional portion. Participants also prioritised programmes that had greater number of parents fully completing them, and were willing to pay an extra £4810/year for every additional parent completing a programme. The number of parents enrolling in a programme (holding the number completing fixed) and hours of staff time required did not significantly influence choices. Conclusions Emphasis on high programme completion rates and success increasing children’s fruit and vegetable intake has potential to increase commissioning of community based obesity prevention programmes.

Funding

NIHR Academy Programme

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

BMC Public Health

Volume

20

Issue

1

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Springer under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

21/09/2020

Publication date

2020-10-12

Copyright date

2020

eISSN

1471-2458

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Elizabeth Stamp Deposit date: 28 October 2020

Article number

1535

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