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Modeling individual trust development in computer mediated collaboration: A comparison of approaches

journal contribution
posted on 09.04.2019 by Xusen Cheng, Linda Macaulay, Alex Zarifis
This research models and investigates individual trust development over time in computer mediated collaboration. Risk, benefit, utility value, effort, power and interest are six factors that influence individual trust development. This paper introduces two new approaches, the scale balance model and the trust spider diagram, to help model and investigate individual trust development over time. A 2 year longitudinal case study is used to investigate individual trust development based on a yearlong student project. 16 student groups participated in the computer mediated collaboration. Survey data were collected at three points throughout the project year and the results are analyzed using the two approaches. Interviews were also conducted at the end of the project. In this research, interesting findings, such as some dynamic features, are revealed by using the methods. Each approach to analyzing individual trust development has its strengths and weaknesses, and using the two together has the benefit of mitigating some weaknesses and combining the strengths. Analyzing trust development over time contributes to enhance computer mediated collaboration in both theoretical research and practical application.

Funding

The authors would like to thank the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 71101029), the SRF for ROCS of SEM, and Program for Innovative Research Team in UIBE for providing funding for part of this research.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Economics

Published in

Computers in Human Behavior

Volume

29

Issue

4

Pages

1733 - 1741

Citation

CHENG, X., MACAULAY, L. and ZARIFIS, A., 2013. Modeling individual trust development in computer mediated collaboration: A comparison of approaches. Computers in Human Behavior, 29 (4), pp.1733-1741.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2013

Notes

This paper is closed access.

ISSN

0747-5632

Language

en

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