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Neural bases for anticipation skill in soccer: an fMRI study

journal contribution
posted on 19.07.2016, 09:32 by Daniel T. Bishop, Michael J. Wright, Robin Jackson, Bruce Abernethy
The aim of this study was to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a soccer anticipation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty-nine participants lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted an oncoming opponent’s movements. Video clips were occluded at four time points, and participants were grouped according to in-task performance. Early occlusion reduced prediction accuracy significantly for all participants, as did the opponent’s execution of a deceptive maneuver; however, high-skill participants were significantly more accurate than their low-skill counterparts under deceptive conditions. This perceptual-cognitive superiority was associated with greater activation of cortical and subcortical structures involved in executive function and oculomotor control. The contributions of the present findings to an existing neural model of anticipation in sport are highlighted.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Volume

35

Pages

98 - 109

Citation

BISHOP. D.T. ... et al., 2013. Neural bases for anticipation skill in soccer: an fMRI study. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 35 (1), pp.98-109.

Publisher

© Human Kinetics

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2013

Notes

Closed access.

ISSN

0895-2779

eISSN

1543-2904

Language

en

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