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Patient and public involvement facilitators: Could they be the key to the NHS quality improvement agenda?

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journal contribution
posted on 21.02.2020, 14:08 by Sarah Todd, Christine Coupland, Raymond Randall
© 2020 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objective: Research into patient and public involvement (PPI) has not examined in detail patient and public involvement facilitators’ (PPIFs) roles and activities. This study analysed PPIFs’ roles using qualitative data gathered from three different UK health-care organizations. Design: Thematic analysis was used to examine cross-sectional data collected using a mixed-methods approach from three organizations: a mental health trust, a community health social enterprise and an acute hospital trust. The data set comprised of 27 interviews and 48 observations. Findings: Patient and public involvement facilitators roles included the leadership and management of PPI interventions, developing health-care practices and influencing quality improvements (QI). They usually occupied middle-management grades but their PPIF role involved working in isolation or in small teams. They reported facilitating the development and maintenance of relationships between patients and the public, and health-care professionals and service managers. These roles sometimes required them to use conflict resolution skills and involved considerable emotional labour. Integrating information from PPI into service improvement processes was reported to be a challenge for these individuals. Conclusions: Patient and public involvement facilitators capture and hold information that can be used in service improvement. However, they work with limited resources and support. Health-care organizations need to offer more practical support to PPIFs in their efforts to improve care quality, particularly by making their role integral to developing QI strategies.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Published in

Health Expectations

Volume

23

Issue

2

Pages

461 - 472

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© the Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

17/12/2019

Publication date

2020-02-05

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

1369-6513

eISSN

1369-7625

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Christine Coupland . Deposit date: 19 February 2020

Licence

Exports