Rios_etal_2020_Plasticity in the growth of body segments_HT_mothereducation.pdf (14.56 MB)

Plasticity in the growth of body segments in relation to height-for-age and maternal education in Guatemala

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journal contribution
posted on 16.11.2020, 09:49 by L Ríos, JM Terán, C Varea, Barry Bogin
© 2019 The Authors. American Journal of Human Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Objectives: Plasticity in the growth of body segments between populations has been researched in relation to migration, temporal change and high-altitude studies. We study the within population variation in body segments, thus controlling for some of the environmental and genetic differences that could be at play in between populations studies. We test a version of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis, where the growth of head-trunk and hand are prioritized due to their functional significance over height and leg growth. Materials and methods: A total of 3913 Guatemalan, rural, semi-urban and urban, Maya and Ladino children 6 to 15 years old were studied. Height, sitting height, leg length, and metacarpal length were studied in relation to three proxies for living conditions: height- and leg length-for-age, and maternal education. Estimation statistics and null hypothesis significance testing were used to analyze the data. Results: Metatarsal length and sitting height values were higher than height and leg length respectively. Relative metacarpal length was conserved across height-for-age groups. Females were less affected than males for metacarpal length and sitting height, but more affected for leg length. Conclusion: Our results agree with the thrifty phenotype hypothesis, where metacarpal and sitting height growth would be prioritized over height and leg length due to greater functional significance.

Funding

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Grant/Award Number: OPP1125811

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

American Journal of Human Biology

Volume

32

Issue

4

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

04/12/2019

Publication date

2019-12-19

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

1042-0533

eISSN

1520-6300

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Barry Bogin Deposit date: 13 November 2020

Article number

e23376

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