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Predictors of the acute postprandial response to breaking up prolonged sitting

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journal contribution
posted on 12.12.2019 by Joe Henson, Charlotte Edwardson, Carlos A Celis-Morales, Melanie J Davies, David Dunstan, Dale Esliger, Jason MR Gill, Aadil Kazi, Kamlesh Khunti, James King, Matthew McCarthy, Naveed Sattar, David Stensel, Latha Velayudhan, Francesco Zaccardi, Thomas Yates
Purpose
To identify predictors of favourable changes to postprandial insulin and glucose levels in response to interrupting prolonged sitting time with standing or light intensity physical activity.
Methods
Data were combined from four similarly designed randomised acute cross-over trials (n=129; BMI range 19.6 to 44.6kg/m2; South Asian=31.0%; dysglycaemia=27.1%). Treatments included: prolonged sitting (6.5hours) or prolonged sitting broken-up with either standing or light-intensity physical activity (5 minutes every 30 minutes). Time-averaged postprandial responses for insulin and glucose were calculated for each treatment (mean±95% CI). Mutually adjusted interaction terms were used to examine whether anthropometric (BMI), demographic (age, sex, ethnicity (white European vs. South Asian)) and a cardiometabolic
variable (HOMA-IR) modified responses.
Results
Postprandial insulin and glucose were reduced when individuals interrupted prolonged sitting with bouts of light physical activity, but not with standing. Reductions in time-averaged postprandial insulin were more pronounced if individuals were South Asian compared with white European (-18.9mU/L (-23.5%) vs. -8.2mU/L (-9.3%)), female compared to male (-15.0mU/L (-21.2%) vs. -12.1mU/L (-17.6%)) or had a BMI ≥27.2kg/m2 (-20.9mU/L (-22.9%) vs. -8.7mU/L (-18.2%)). Similarly, being female (-0.4mmol/L (-0.6mmol/L, -0.2mmol/L) (-6.8%) vs. –0.1mmol/L (-0.3mmol/L, 1mmol/L) (-1.7%)) or having a BMI ≥27.2kg/m2 (-0.4mmol/L (-0.6mmol/L, -0.2mmol/L) (-6.7%) vs. –0.2mmol/L (-0.4mmol/L, 0.0mmol/L) (-3.4%)) modified the postprandial glucose response. No significant interactions were found for HOMA-IR or age.
Conclusion
Being female, South Asian or having a higher BMI, all predicted greater reductions in postprandial insulin, while being female and having a higher BMI predicted greater reductions in postprandial glucose when sitting was interrupted with light physical activity. These results could help to guide personalised interventions in high-risk participants for whom breaking prolonged sitting time with light activity may yield the greatest therapeutic potential.

Funding

UK Research Councils’ Lifelong Health and Wellbeing Initiative in partnership with the Department of Health (grant number MR/K025090/1) (STAND UP)

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre

National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care–East Midlands (NIHR CLAHRC–EM)

Leicester Clinical Trials Unit

NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (NHMRC APP1078360)

Victorian Government’s OIS Program

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Volume

52

Issue

6

Pages

1385 - 1393

Publisher

Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Sports Medicine

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an open access article. It is published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Sports Medicine under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

06/12/2019

Publication date

2020-02-13

Copyright date

2019

ISSN

0195-9131

eISSN

1530-0315

Language

en

Depositor

Prof David Stensel. Deposit date: 9 December 2019

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