South Africa Art Now.pdf (21.95 kB)
0/0

South African art now by Sue Williamson [book review].

Download (21.95 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 22.08.2014 by Marion Arnold
The question, ‘Who is South African?’ is not easily answered yet it needs consideration when reviewing South African Art Now. In 1652 the Dutch occupied the Cape. They co-existed with nomadic Khoisan people but imported slaves from Central Africa and the Far East, resulting in the ‘Colored’ (mixed race) classification of the 20th century. In 1806 the British assumed rule of the Cape Colony, while on the eastern frontier Bantu-speaking peoples moved down Africa. Different black groups battled for supremacy and the Zulu became dominant, causing other clans to disperse. Resenting British government, the Boers moved north (the Great Trek) and founded independent republics, and the British established a second colony in the east – Natal. In 1910 the Union of South Africa bound together British colonies and former Boer republics; theoretically the inhabitants of this new British dominion were ‘South African’...

History

School

  • The Arts, English and Drama

Department

  • Arts

Published in

African Arts

Volume

44

Issue

1

Pages

92 - 93

Citation

ARNOLD, M., 2011. South African art now by Sue Williamson [book review]. African Arts, 44 (1), pp. 92 - 93.

Publisher

MIT Press / © Regents of the University of California

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2011

Notes

This is a book review

ISSN

0001-9933

eISSN

1937-2108

Language

en

Exports

Logo branding

Keyword(s)

Exports