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Strategic entrepreneurship behaviours and the innovation ambidexterity of young technology-based firms in incubators

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journal contribution
posted on 02.07.2020 by Mathew Hughes, Paul Hughes, Robert Morgan, Ian Hodgkinson, Younggeun Lee
Innovation ambidexterity is especially complex for young technology-based firms because they are resource-challenged and knowledge-deficient in strategic terms; but they possess considerable scope for entrepreneurship. Strategic entrepreneurship may provide a solution. Incubators emerged as a policy solution precisely due to this dilemma. We conceptualise that strategic entrepreneurship, as a synthesis of young technology-based firms’ opportunity-seeking and advantage-seeking behaviours, can affect both explorative and exploitative innovation activities in these firms, and expect that subsequent innovation ambidexterity affects profitability. Our empirical analyses reveal complex and competing interrelationships that both ease and exacerbate the tensions associated with innovation ambidexterity. We contribute to theory by testing strategic entrepreneurship as it applies to innovation ambidexterity and evidence behaviours that contribute to its foundations. To entrepreneurs and managers, we offer a set of prescriptions for innovation ambidexterity in young firms that accounts for the complementarities between complex and theoretically opposing constructs.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Published in

International Small Business Journal

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal International Small Business Journal and the definitive published version is available at ........Users who receive access to an article through a repository are reminded that the article is protected by copyright and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses. Users may also download and save a local copy of an article accessed in an institutional repository for the user's personal reference.

Acceptance date

01/07/2020

ISSN

0266-2426

eISSN

1741-2870

Depositor

Prof Mat Hughes Deposit date: 1 July 2020

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