Shenfield et al 2020 The impact of lseep los on sustined and transiet attention.pdf (6.19 MB)

The impact of sleep loss on sustained and transient attention: an EEG study

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journal contribution
posted on 05.05.2020, 11:14 by Lucienee Shenfield, Vanessa Beanland, Ashleigh Filtness, Apthorp Deborah
Sleep is one of our most important physiological functions that maintains physical and mental health. Two studies examined whether discrete areas of attention are equally affected by sleep loss. This was achieved using a repeated-measures within-subjects design, with two contrasting conditions: normal sleep and partial sleep restriction of 5-h. Study 1 compared performance on a sustained attention task (Psychomotor Vigilance task; PVT) with performance on a transient attention task (Attentional Blink; AB). PVT performance, but not performance on the AB task, was impaired after sleep restriction. Study 2 sought to determine the neural underpinnings of the phenomenon, using electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency analysis, which measured activity during the brief eyes-closed resting state before the tasks. AB performance was unaffected by sleep restriction, despite clearly observable changes in brain activity. EEG results showed a significant reduction in resting state alpha oscillations that was most prominent centrally in the right hemisphere. Changes in individual alpha and delta power were also found to be related to changes in subjective sleepiness and PVT performance. Results likely reflect different levels of impairment in specific forms of attention following sleep loss.

Funding

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (APP1054726)

QUT Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation grant.

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Politics and International Studies

Published in

PeerJ

Volume

8

Publisher

PeerJ Inc.

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited.

Acceptance date

23/03/2020

Publication date

2020-05-04

Copyright date

2020

eISSN

2167-8359

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Ashleigh Filtness. Deposit date: 4 May 2020

Article number

e8960

Licence

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