Uptake & Application _JIT, 1999 - repository copy_.pdf (87.59 kB)

The uptake and application of workflow management systems in the UK financial services sector

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journal contribution
posted on 18.03.2011 by Neil Doherty, Ivor Perry
Workflow management systems (WFMSs) are an important new technology, which are likely to have a significant impact on the way in which clerical and administrative operations are organised and executed. This paper seeks to investigate how WFMSs are being exploited and utilised commercially by UK-based organisations operating in the financial services sector. In-depth interviews were conducted with fourteen project managers to explore the development, application and commercial implications of this powerful, yet flexible, technology. The results indicate that workflow technology has the potential to facilitate significant changes to the way in which an organisation conducts its business, through the automation of a wide range of document-intensive operations. Furthermore, when applied in a well-focussed manner it has the potential to realise significant increases in an organisation’s flexibility, and productivity, as well as delivering major improvements to the quality, speed and consistency of customer service.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Citation

DOHERTY, N.F. and PERRY, I., 1999. The uptake and application of workflow management systems in the UK financial services sector. Journal of Information Technology, 14 (2), pp. 149-160.

Publisher

Palgrave Macmillan (© The Association for Information Technology Trust)

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

1999

Notes

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in the Journal of Information Technology [© The Association for Information Technology Trust]. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/026839699344647

ISSN

0268-3962;1466-4437

Language

en

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