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A systematic review of current understandings of employability

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journal contribution
posted on 09.12.2015, 13:56 authored by Stella Williams, Lorna J. Dodd, Catherine Steele, Raymond Randall
A theoretical framework is essential for the effective evaluation of employability. However, there are a wide range of definitions of employability coexisting in current literature. A review into existing ways in which employability has been conceptualised is needed to inform a better understanding of the nature of contributions made by various employability development opportunities, and appropriate assessment of these contributions. A systematic review is presented, assessing the similarities and differences between the components of employability conceptualisations, focusing on employability at an individual level. Relevant publications were identified through a sensitive search strategy of eight electronic bibliographic databases from 1960 to 2014. Data were extracted from 16 eligible manuscripts. Capital, career management and contextual dimensions were identified as unifying themes in these components. Findings indicate that success in developing employability needs to be contextualised within a conceptualisation of employability as a multifaceted construct.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Published in

Journal of Education and Work

Citation

WILLIAMS, S. ... et al, 2015. A systematic review of current understandings of employability. Journal of Education and Work, 29 (8), pp. 877-901.

Publisher

© Taylor and Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2015

Notes

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Education and Work on 7th November 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13639080.2015.1102210.

ISSN

1363-9080

eISSN

1469-9435

Language

en