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Additional clothing increases heat load in elite female rugby sevens players

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journal contribution
posted on 11.10.2021, 08:27 by Mitchell J Henderson, Bryna CR Chrismas, Christopher J Stevens, Andrew Novak, Job Fransen, Aaron J Coutts, Lee TaylorLee Taylor
To determine whether elite female rugby sevens players are exposed to core temperatures (Tc) during training in the heat that replicate the temperate match demands previously reported and to investigate whether additional clothing worn during a hot training session meaningfully increases the heat load experienced. Methods: A randomized parallel-group study design was employed, with all players completing the same approximately 70-minute training session (27.5°C–34.8°C wet bulb globe temperature) and wearing a standardized training ensemble (synthetic rugby shorts and training tee [control (CON); n = 8]) or additional clothing (standardized training ensemble plus compression garments and full tracksuit [additional clothing (AC); n = 6]). Groupwise differences in Tc, sweat rate, GPS-measured external locomotive output, rating of perceived exertion, and perceptual thermal load were compared. Results: Mean (P = .006, η2 p = .88) and peak (P < .001, η2 p = .97) Tc were higher in AC compared with CON during the training session. There were no differences in external load (F4,9 = 0.155, P = .956, Wilks Λ = 0.935, η2 p = .06) or sweat rate (P = .054, Cohen d = 1.09). A higher rating of perceived exertion (P = .016, Cohen d = 1.49) was observed in AC compared with CON. No exertional-heat-illness symptomology was reported in either group. Conclusions: Player Tc is similar between training performed in hot environments and match play in temperate conditions when involved for >6 minutes. Additional clothing is a viable and effective method to increase heat strain in female rugby sevens players without compromising training specificity or external locomotive capacity.

Funding

Aspire Zone Foundation (Doha, Qatar)

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

Volume

16

Issue

10

Pages

1424 - 1431

Publisher

Human Kinetics

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© 2021 Human Kinetics

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2020-0620

Publication date

2021-03-26

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1555-0265

eISSN

1555-0273

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Lee Taylor . Deposit date: 7 October 2021