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Anti-social behaviour legislation and the policing of boy racers: dispersal orders and seizure of vehicles

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journal contribution
posted on 25.11.2014, 14:32 by Karen Lumsden
This article considers the policing of young drivers in Scotland who are known as boy racers. It outlines the ways in which the police addressed the problem of anti-social driving by youths in a built-up urban environment in the context of concern and pressure from businesses, residents, the local authority, media, and government. Policing practices were shaped by the introduction of anti-social behaviour legislation including dispersal orders and seizure of vehicles. This involved behaviours not previously seen as deviant or anti-social now being defined as such, in relation to the perceptions of local residents and businesses. The article considers the success of the use of anti-social behaviour legislation, including dispersal orders and seizure of vehicles, and the impact this had on police relations with young drivers.

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Communication, Media, Social and Policy Studies

Published in

Policing: a Journal of Policy and Practice

Volume

online first

Pages

0 - ?

Citation

LUMSDEN, K., 2014. Anti-social behaviour legislation and the policing of boy racers: dispersal orders and seizure of vehicles. Policing, 8 (2), pp. 135-143.

Publisher

Oxford University Press / © The Author.

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2014

Notes

This article has been accepted for publication in Policing Published by Oxford University Press

ISSN

1752-4512

Language

en

Location

United Kingdom