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Appetite and energy intake responses to acute energy deficits in females versus males

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posted on 05.11.2015, 11:59 by Nawal Alajmi, Kevin Deighton, James KingJames King, Alvaro Reischak-Oliveira, Lucy K. Wasse, Jenny Jones, Rachel L. Batterham, David StenselDavid Stensel
PURPOSE: To explore whether compensatory responses to acute energy deficits induced by exercise or diet differ by sex. METHODS: In experiment one, twelve healthy women completed three 9 h trials (control, exercise-induced (Ex-Def) and food restriction induced energy deficit (Food-Def)) with identical energy deficits being imposed in the Ex-Def (90 min run, ∼70% of VO2 max) and Food-Def trials. In experiment two, 10 men and 10 women completed two 7 h trials (control and exercise). Sixty min of running (∼70% of VO2 max) was performed at the beginning of the exercise trial. Participants rested throughout the remainder of the exercise trial and during the control trial. Appetite ratings, plasma concentrations of gut hormones and ad libitum energy intake were assessed during main trials. RESULTS: In experiment one, an energy deficit of ∼3500 kJ induced via food restriction increased appetite and food intake. These changes corresponded with heightened concentrations of plasma acylated ghrelin and lower peptide YY3-36. None of these compensatory responses were apparent when an equivalent energy deficit was induced by exercise. In experiment two, appetite ratings and plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations were lower in exercise than control but energy intake did not differ between trials. The appetite, acylated ghrelin and energy intake response to exercise did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Women exhibit compensatory appetite, gut hormone and food intake responses to acute energy restriction but not in response to an acute bout of exercise. Additionally, men and women appear to exhibit similar acylated ghrelin and PYY3-36 responses to exercise-induced energy deficits. These findings advance understanding regarding the interaction between exercise and energy homeostasis in women.

Funding

This research was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit based at University Hospitals of Leicester and Loughborough University. This research was also supported by the Rosetrees Trust and the Brazilian National Research Council.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Volume

48

Issue

3

Pages

412-420

Citation

ALAJMI, N. ... et al, 2016. Appetite and energy intake responses to acute energy deficits in females versus males. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 48(3), pp.412-420.

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins © American College of Sports Medicine

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2016-03-31

Copyright date

2016

Notes

This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in ALAJMI, N. ... et al, 2016. Appetite and energy intake responses to acute energy deficits in females versus males. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 48(3), pp.412-420.

ISSN

0195-9131

eISSN

1530-0315

Language

en