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Applying mass spectrometry-based assays to explore gut microbial metabolism and associations with disease

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journal contribution
posted on 08.10.2019, 11:12 by Liam HeaneyLiam Heaney
The workings of the gut microbiome have gained increasing interest in recent years through the mounting evidence that the microbiota plays an influential role in human health and disease. A principal focus of this research seeks to further understand the production of metabolic by-products produced by bacteria resident in the gut, and the subsequent interaction of these metabolites on host physiology and pathophysiology of disease. Gut bacterial metabolites of interest are predominately formed via metabolic breakdown of dietary compounds including choline and L-carnitine (trimethylamine N-oxide), amino acids (phenol- and indole-containing uremic toxins) and non-digestible dietary fibers (short-chain fatty acids). Investigations have been accelerated through the application of mass spectrometry-based assays to quantitatively assess the concentration of these metabolites in laboratory- and animal-based experiments, as well as for direct circulating measurements in clinical research populations. This review seeks to explore the impact of these metabolites on disease, as well as to introduce the application of mass spectrometry for those less accustomed to its use as a clinical tool, highlighting pertinent research related to its use for measurements of gut bacteria-mediated metabolites to further understand their associations with disease.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

Volume

58

Issue

5

Pages

719 - 732

Publisher

De Gruyter

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© Walter de Gruyter

Publisher statement

This paper was published in the journal Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2019-0974

Acceptance date

06/10/2019

Publication date

2019-10-22

Copyright date

2019

ISSN

1434-6621

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Liam Heaney