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Are running socks beneficial for comfort? The role of the sock and sock fiber type on shoe microclimate and subjective evaluations

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journal contribution
posted on 26.01.2021, 11:46 by Anna West, George HavenithGeorge Havenith, Simon HodderSimon Hodder
This study evaluated the effect of socks (different in fiber type) and the effect of not wearing a sock on perceptions of thermal comfort in relation to changes in foot skin temperature and shoe microclimate (temperature and humidity) during rest and exercise. Ten females completed five trials on separate occasions. Four socks (cotton, wool, polyester, Coolmax) and no sock were evaluated. Trials were conducted at 23°C, 50% relative humidity and consisted of rest (10 min seated), treadmill running (40 min, 7.5 km·h−1) and recovery (15 min seated). Foot skin temperature and shoe microclimate were measured at seven sites on the right foot. Foot skin hydration was measured at nine foot sites. Perceptual responses were recorded. Foot thermo-physiological and foot perceptual responses were similar for all sock conditions (p > 0.05). Similar foot thermo-physiological responses were also observed between the sock and no sock conditions (p > 0.05). Interestingly, however, not wearing a sock resulted in greater perceptions of foot wetness, stickiness and discomfort (p < 0.05). As tactile interactions caused by foot movement within the shoe are strong predictors of foot wetness perception (a key contributor to wear discomfort), socks are important in reducing the tactile cues generated. The sock is therefore an important area for development and relevant for overall improvements in footwear comfort.

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Textile Research Journal

Volume

91

Issue

15-16

Pages

1698-1712

Publisher

SAGE

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by SAGE under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

17/12/2020

Publication date

2021-01-21

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0040-5175

eISSN

1746-7748

Language

en

Depositor

Prof George Havenith. Deposit date: 21 January 2021