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Assessing the female figure identification technique’s reliability as a body shape classification system

journal contribution
posted on 15.04.2021, 10:24 by Christopher J. ParkerChristopher J. Parker, Steven George Hayes, Kathryn Brownbridge, Simeon Gill
This paper demonstrates the effects of small differences in measurement definitions on resultant body shape classification. Ergonomic researchers consider the Female Figure Identification Technique (FFIT) a ‘gold standard’ body shape classification system to describe variation in a population’s 3D profile. Nevertheless, researchers use FFIT without scientific basis or considering their ergonomic suitability. This paper rigorously evaluates FFIT, focusing on ergonomics, garment construction, and scientific research applications. Through analysing 1,679 3D Body Scans, we assess the level of agreement between the FFIT’s body shape classification when measurements placed following FFIT’s or SizeUK’s guidance. We establish how different interpretations of FFIT’s measurement placement cause the same body to be categorised into different shapes - in up to 40% of cases. FFIT omits shoulder measurements that have little relationship to body shape yet are vital in garment construction. Using FFIT with different dataset and definitions, therefore, leads to inconsistent conclusions about shape differences.

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Ergonomics

Volume

64

Issue

8

Pages

1035-1051

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Taylor & Francis

Publisher statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Ergonomics on 12 Apr 2021, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00140139.2021.1902572.

Acceptance date

05/03/2021

Publication date

2021-04-12

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0014-0139

eISSN

1366-5847

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Chris Parker. Deposit date: 5 March 2021