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Avoidance and aggregation create consistent egg distribution patterns of congeneric caddisflies across spatially variable oviposition landscapes

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journal contribution
posted on 13.11.2020, 15:47 by Jill Lancaster, Barbara J Downes, Rebecca E Lester, Stephen RiceStephen Rice
© 2020, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Amongst oviparous animals, the spatial distribution of individuals is often set initially by where females lay eggs, with potential implications for populations and species coexistence. Do the spatial arrangements of oviposition sites or female behaviours determine spatial patterns of eggs? The consequences of spatial patterns may be context independent if strong behaviours drive patterns; context dependent if the local environment dominates. We tested these ideas using a guild of stream-dwelling caddisflies that oviposit on emergent rocks, focussing on genera with contrasting behaviours. In naturally occurring oviposition landscapes (riffles with emergent rocks), we surveyed the spatial arrangement and environmental characteristics of all emergent rocks, identified and enumerated egg masses on each. Multiple riffles were surveyed to test for spatially invariant patterns and behaviours. In landscapes, we tested for spatial clumping of oviposition sites exploited by each species and for segregation of congeneric species. At oviposition sites, we characterised the frequency distributions of egg masses and tested for species associations. Genus-specific behaviours produced different spatial patterns of egg masses in the same landscapes. Congregative behaviour of Ulmerochorema spp. at landscape scales and an aggregative response at preferred oviposition sites led to clumped patterns, local aggregation and species overlap. In contrast, avoidance behaviours by congeners of Apsilochorema resulted in no or weak clumping, and species segregation in some landscapes. Spatial patterns were consistent across riffles that varied in area and oviposition site density. These results suggest that quite different oviposition behaviours may be context independent, and the consequences of spatial patterns may be spatially invariant also.

Funding

Australian Research Council (DP 160102262)

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • Geography and Environment

Published in

Oecologia

Volume

192

Issue

2

Pages

375 - 389

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Springer

Publisher statement

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Oecologia. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-019-04587-7

Acceptance date

26/12/2019

Publication date

2020-01-14

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

0029-8549

eISSN

1432-1939

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Stephen Rice Deposit date: 12 November 2020