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Biopolymer dynamics driven by helical flagella

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journal contribution
posted on 10.12.2018, 11:21 authored by Andrew K. Balin, Andreas Zottl, Julia M. Yeomans, Tyler Shendruk
Microbial flagellates typically inhabit complex suspensions of polymeric material which can impact the swimming speed of motile microbes, filter feeding of sessile cells, and the generation of biofilms. There is currently a need to better understand how the fundamental dynamics of polymers near active cells or flagella impacts these various phenomena, in particular, the hydrodynamic and steric influence of a rotating helical filament on suspended polymers. Our Stokesian dynamics simulations show that as a stationary rotating helix pumps fluid along its long axis, polymers migrate radially inward while being elongated. We observe that the actuation of the helix tends to increase the probability of finding polymeric material within its pervaded volume. This accumulation of polymers within the vicinity of the helix is stronger for longer polymers. We further analyze the stochastic work performed by the helix on the polymers and show that this quantity is positive on average and increases with polymer contour length.

Funding

This work was supported through funding from the ERC Advanced Grant No. 291234 MiCE and we acknowledge EMBO funding to T.N.S. (ALTF181-2013). A.Z. acknowledges funding by Marie Skłodowska Curie Intra-European Fellowship (G.A. No. 653284) within Horizon 2020

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematical Sciences

Published in

Physical Review Fluids

Volume

2

Issue

11

Citation

BALIN, A.K. ... et al., 2017. Biopolymer dynamics driven by helical flagella. Physical Review Fluids, 2: 113102.

Publisher

© American Physical Society

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

01/11/2017

Publication date

2017-11-16

Notes

This paper was published in the journal Physical Review Fluids and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.113102

eISSN

2469-990X

Language

en

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