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Building inclusive nations in the age of migration

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Nation and diversity are often casted in oppositional terms. The present joint-intervention explores the limits and possibilities of what we call ‘inclusive nation’, i.e. a nation which embraces rather than expunging diversity. To reflect on this idea, the Loughborough University Nationalism Network (LUNN) organized a symposium, bringing together both academics and relevant stakeholders, to explore both theoretically and practically the feasibility of the inclusive nation. For reason of space, here we present only the theoretical views of academics. While Billig and Yuval-Davis highlight the inherent exclusive thrust of nationalism, Kaufmann and Hearn suggest two distinct ways to move away the traditional understanding of nationalism as a site of singularity, oppression and exclusion. A final rejoinder by Nyhagen pushes the debate further interrogating the boundaries of national belonging.

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Geography and Environment

Published in

Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power

Volume

2016

Citation

ANTONSICH, M., MAVROUDI, E. and MIHELJ, S., 2017. Building Inclusive Nations in the Age of Migration. Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, 24 (2), pp. 156-176.

Publisher

© Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

28/01/2016

Publication date

2017

Notes

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power on 06 Apr 2016, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1070289X.2016.1148607

ISSN

1547-3384

Language

en