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Can cognitive dissonance methods developed in the West for combatting the 'thin ideal' help slow the rapidly increasing prevalence of eating disorders in non-Western cultures?

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posted on 15.10.2015, 10:18 authored by Gemma WitcombGemma Witcomb, Jon Arcelus, Jue Chen
Summary: Eating disorders are common, life-threatening conditions in Western countries, but until relatively recently they were regarded as uncommon in non-Western cultures. However, the prevalence of eating disorders in many of the more affluent non-Western countries is rising rapidly as community members, particularly young women, internalize the 'thin ideal' that has been widely promoted by the international media. This review discusses the factors involved in the development of eating disorders in non-Western settings with a particular emphasis on the influences of urbanization, modernization, Westernization, and the resulting changes in women's roles. The cognitive dissonance programs developed in Western countries that have proven successful in countering the negative effects of the thin idea are described and their potential application to East Asia and other non-Western countries are discussed.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry

Volume

25

Issue

6

Pages

332 - 341

Citation

WITCOMB, G.L., ARCELUS, J. and CHEN, J., 2013. Can cognitive dissonance methods developed in the West for combatting the 'thin ideal' help slow the rapidly increasing prevalence of eating disorders in non-Western cultures?. Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry, 25(6), pp. 332-341.

Publisher

© Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2013

Notes

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by the Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

ISSN

1002-0829

Language

en

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