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Psychophysiology - 2024 - Tyne - Cardiovascular reactivity to acute psychological stress is associated with generalized.pdf (1.13 MB)

Cardiovascular reactivity to acute psychological stress is associated with generalized self-efficacy and self-efficacy outcomes during adventure challenges

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posted on 2024-02-20, 16:37 authored by Will TyneWill Tyne, David FletcherDavid Fletcher, Clare StevinsonClare Stevinson, Nicola PaineNicola Paine

Outdoor adventure challenges are commonly used to enhance self-efficacy, but the physiological mechanisms involved remain unexplored. Additionally, while studies have documented the influence of self-efficacy on stress management, general self-efficacy has yet to be fully understood in the context of cardiovascular stress reactivity (CVR). This study investigated the influence of self-efficacy beliefs on CVR during acute psychological stress tasks. Additionally, it explored whether CVR serves as a novel mechanism underlying the outcomes of outdoor adventure challenges. As part of a wider randomized controlled trial, participants (n = 55) were invited to complete a laboratory session to assess CVR to an active (paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT)) and a passive (cold pressor test (CPT)) stress task. Randomized participants (n = 33) to the experimental condition also engaged in a high ropes challenge course after the laboratory session. It was found that greater self-reported self-efficacy was associated with larger CVR during the CPT and positively associated with perceived engagement and performance during the PASAT. Secondly, participants reporting positive change in self-efficacy post-intervention were associated with greater CVR and greater CVR was associated with higher ratings of intervention engagement and perceived challenge. This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that greater efficacy beliefs may heighten CVR to passive acute psychological stressors. Habitual stress reactivity may represent a novel mechanism involved in outdoor and adventure-based interventions. Future research should continue to explore the impact of psychological variables on stress physiology and examine CVR as a potential mechanism in adventure experiences.

Funding

School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University

The Leadership High organisation

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Psychophysiology

Publisher

Wiley

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Acceptance date

2024-01-30

Publication date

2024-02-15

Copyright date

2024

ISSN

0048-5772

eISSN

1469-8986

Language

  • en

Depositor

Dr Nicola Paine. Deposit date: 1 February 2024

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