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Characterisation of colloidal dispersions using ultrasound spectroscopy and multiple-scattering theory inclusive of shear-wave effects

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journal contribution
posted on 25.08.2016, 11:12 by Derek Michael Forrester, Jinrui Huang, Valerie PinfieldValerie Pinfield
Ultrasonic spectrometry measures the attenuation of a sound wave propagating through a sample. In slurries the ultrasound signal becomes highly attenuated as a function of particle size, concentration and density. To monitor these properties in slurries the attenuation requires interpretation using a mathematical model. We examine different sizes of silica suspended in water, at different concentrations, and frequencies up to 100 MHz. We determine that a new multiple scattering theory inclusive of shear-wave reconversion effects (i.e. conversion of compressional wave to shear wave and back to compressional wave at the particle/liquid boundary) is successful for attenuation prediction in the range up to ≈20MHz and 20% (by volume). Beyond this level the model with shear-effects begins to deviate from the real attenuation, but is still more representative of the experimental results than modelling only an incident compressional wave. Thus, shear-wave reconversion modelling is essential to more accurately reflect the attenuation spectra in a solid particle in suspension system, and dictates the ultrasonic attenuation as particle sizes decrease and concentration increases.

Funding

The authors acknowledge funding from the EPSRC, grant number EP=L018780=1.

History

School

  • Aeronautical, Automotive, Chemical and Materials Engineering

Department

  • Chemical Engineering

Published in

Chemical Engineering Research and Design

Citation

FORRESTER, M., HUANG, J. and PINFIELD, V.J., 2016. Characterisation of colloidal dispersions using ultrasound spectroscopy and multiple-scattering theory inclusive of shear-wave effects. Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 114 (October), pp. 69–78.

Publisher

© The Authors. Published by Elsevier

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0/

Acceptance date

04/08/2016

Publication date

2016-08-11

Notes

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Elsevier under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

ISSN

0263-8762

eISSN

1744-3563

Language

en