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devlin-et-al-2024-concepts-of-order-why-is-ordinality-processed-slower-and-less-accurately-for-non-consecutive-sequences.pdf (310.42 kB)

Concepts of order: why is ordinality processed slower and less accurately for non-consecutive sequences?

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posted on 2024-02-19, 15:22 authored by Declan Devlin, Korbinian MoellerKorbinian Moeller, Iro Xenidou-DervouIro Xenidou-Dervou, Bert Reynvoet, Francesco SellaFrancesco Sella

Both adults and children are slower at judging the ordinality of non-consecutive sequences (e.g., 1-3-5) than consecutive sequences (e.g., 1-2-3). It has been suggested that the processing of non-consecutive sequences is slower because it conflicts with the intuition that only count-list sequences are correctly ordered. An alternative explanation, however, may be that people simply find it difficult to switch between consecutive and non-consecutive concepts of order during order judgement tasks. Therefore, in adult participants, we tested whether presenting consecutive and non-consecutive sequences separately would eliminate this switching demand and thus improve performance. In contrast with this prediction, however, we observed similar patterns of response times independent of whether sequences were presented separately or together (Experiment 1). Furthermore, this pattern of results remained even when we doubled the number of trials and made participants explicitly aware when consecutive and non-consecutive sequences were presented separately (Experiment 2). Overall, these results suggest slower response times for non-consecutive sequences do not result from a cognitive demand of switching between consecutive and non-consecutive concepts of order, at least not in adults.

Funding

Centre for Mathematical Cognition, Loughborough University

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Published in

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Publisher

Sage

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© Experimental Psychology Society

Publisher statement

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).

Acceptance date

2023-09-12

Publication date

2023-12-05

Copyright date

2023

ISSN

1747-0218

eISSN

1747-0226

Language

  • en

Depositor

Declan Devlin. Deposit date: 16 September 2023

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